Presenter/Creator Information

Stan Mathis, Yale UniversityFollow

Description

ABSTRACT:

The aim of the study was to assess how well the public transportation system of New Haven County was matched to the public transit need using publicly available geospatial datasets from state and federal sources. Geospatial bus stop data was extracted from public State of Connecticut data sets. Census tract geography was extracted from US Census TIGER files while census tract aggregated household vehicle access data was queried from the American Community Survey data access server. A census tract’s Need was defined as percentage of households reporting access to zero vehicles; its supply was defined as the number of bus stops per square mile of census tract. Analysis found pockets of need in six communities across the county. Need was mapped to supply by dividing tracts into need above and below the median and supply above and below the median. This defined areas of Over Served (low need, high supply), Good Fit (high need, high supply), and Under Served (high need, low supply). This stratification was mapped, exposing strongly underserved pockets in five communities and one anomalous neighborhood.

 

Need vs. Supply Analysis of the New Haven Public Bus System

ABSTRACT:

The aim of the study was to assess how well the public transportation system of New Haven County was matched to the public transit need using publicly available geospatial datasets from state and federal sources. Geospatial bus stop data was extracted from public State of Connecticut data sets. Census tract geography was extracted from US Census TIGER files while census tract aggregated household vehicle access data was queried from the American Community Survey data access server. A census tract’s Need was defined as percentage of households reporting access to zero vehicles; its supply was defined as the number of bus stops per square mile of census tract. Analysis found pockets of need in six communities across the county. Need was mapped to supply by dividing tracts into need above and below the median and supply above and below the median. This defined areas of Over Served (low need, high supply), Good Fit (high need, high supply), and Under Served (high need, low supply). This stratification was mapped, exposing strongly underserved pockets in five communities and one anomalous neighborhood.