BRINK arrives at a moment of profound unease. Our nation is at odds with itself, unsure of what it is and what it wants to be. Our world has grown wary of democracy, of globalism, of the virtues of progress and diversity, and opportunistic strongmen have capitalized. The environment, scientists tell us, will soon yield to our repeated assaults, and will change in devastating ways. And millennials, raised in the warm afterglow of the End of History, have only now begun to realize how much we need to fight for and how much we need to preserve.

Our generation cannot fail to to confront this moment head on. But first we must understand what is happening to the world around us. We need a forum where we can think carefully, and then refine our thoughts by engaging with others. We need that forum to be in the public sphere—that precious space currently under siege. That is why BRINK is a review of books: a format that invites discussion and debate.

At Yale, where we are based, our generation has been hesitant to engage in this kind of venture. Very little of the writing that students do outside the classroom is both rigorous and argumentative, and very little inside the classroom is accessible to those outside it. Brink unites the highest editorial standards with the highest intellectual expectations—a combination of the literary skill that students show in campus publications with the ambition they show in their academic work. We hope that this will allow our generation to think through—and write for—the world we are about to inherit.

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