Date of Award

January 2012

Document Type

Open Access Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Department

School of Public Health

First Advisor

Tene T. Lewis

Abstract

The current study seeks to explore the association between self-reported experiences of discrimination and life space. Life space is a multidimensional construct that measures the spatial area for which a person intentionally interacts on a daily basis. We explored the cross-sectional association between self-reported experiences of discrimination and life space in a sample of 350 African American older adults recruited between August 2004 and January 2010 from various community-based organizations, churches, and senior facilities within the greater Chicago, IL area. The study participants reported low amounts of discrimination and large life spaces (approximately two-thirds of the population ventured outside of town). The results of this study did not support an association between self-reported discrimination and life space. Future studies should explore this relationship longitudinally and account for frequency of movement within each life space zone.

Comments

This is an Open Access Thesis.

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