Date of Award

January 2015

Document Type

Open Access Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Department

School of Public Health

First Advisor

Debbie Humphries

Abstract

The Uganda Ministry of Health (MOH) is undertaking non-communicable diseases (NCD) training activities for healthcare workers (HCW) as part of its capacity building agenda for addressing NCDs. The MOH is using an integrated, team-based approach to NCD care to routinely screen for and manage NCDs, provide health education, and create an appropriate referral system. This study aimed to evaluate knowledge acquisition resulting from this training. The MOH NCD training curriculum incorporates a participatory and self-directed delivery mechanism. The evaluation was conducted using a pre- and post-, 63-point open-ended and multiple choice test, designed to align with course materials. Paired t-tests between pre- and post-test scores showed highly statistically significant improvements in every demographic category, including overall score for the total sample, age categories, gender, profession, years of experience, and training region (p<0.001). The regression model analyzed factors associated with score improvement, and found that baseline score was inversely related to score improvement. Those with the lowest scores at baseline improved the most (p<0.001). Sub-group differences were seen for region and profession, as well. The growing burden of NCDs in Uganda is a complex problem requiring a multifaceted approach. This MOH HCW training program is one critical component that begins to address the capacity building need of the country using an integrated, team-based approach to improve patient health outcomes and a participatory delivery method to improve HCW learning and communication skills. There is strong evidence that this training program improved NCD knowledge in Ugandan HCW and that benefits are seen across all demographic groups who received the training. Overall, this training is an important component to address the capacity building needs for NCD care in Uganda.

Comments

This is an Open Access Thesis.

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